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Anonymous asked:
Hey Wario, I have a quick question, what do you mean by Reddit Bowser not understanding what Free speech is. I hear bigots use Free Speech all the time as a way to cover their bases when speaking and I know there is something intrinsically wrong with that argument but I can't seem to point it out. Could you please tell me? Thank you for reading this and please have a nice day.

furbearingbrick:

manicpixiedreamergirl:

social-justice-wario:

WAHAHA! Wario often hears people with shitty opinions hide behind the excuse of free speech when called out on their bullshit! As if Wario is infringing on their right to have an opinion by voicing Wario’s own opinion!

These people fundamentally misunderstand freedom of speech, perhaps intentionally! Wario cannot fathom why anyone would use such a flimsy argument! Freedom of speech has nothing to do with people criticising your opinion, or with privately owned websites and businesses telling you they won’t serve as a platform for your bigoted thoughts!

Free speech only applies to what you are legally allowed to say without fear of legal repercussions, and even then there are important limitations, such as libel and slander. The United Kingdom even has the Racial and Religious Hatred Act!

Wario has seen so many ignorant people use freedom of speech as a defense for their shitty opinions, Wario has developed a negative kneejerk reaction to the phrase completely. WAWAWAWAWAWAWAAAA

Free speech is not carte blanche to be an asshole without reprisal. What it means is the government will not stifle your ability to say whatever you want provided it does not incite violence, riots, or damage someone’ good name without proof (inciting violence, inciting to riot, libel, slander, defamation of character). Even if you have proof, it’s a grey area unless you’ve got a good lawyer.

It also works both ways. Any idiot can spew any opinion they want, but the people who can respond to them are also protected if they call the idiot out on their opinion being bullshit, again provided it doesn’t cross the line toward inciting unlawful behavior toward the person.

Last, but by no means least…

Private institutions, businesses, and websites are not beholden to freedom of speech any more than someone in their own home. If a website outlines in its terms of service/terms of use that you cannot be a racist asshole, and you run around slinging every slur in the book, you cannot fall back on freedom of speech. Your right to freedom of speech does not extend to non-government bodies banning you from the premises or anything else so long as it does not involve you being taken to the police station or fined by an officer of the law or another government body.

So anyone who uses that defense is, in short, a fucking moron ignorant of their own basic rights as they apply to the real world and not the fantasy land their mind inhabits.

this just became relevant again.

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

 Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.
- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.

- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

Source: fredscience

sageoftenpaths:

B. Y. E

sageoftenpaths:

B. Y. E

Source: fadedtimes

clairebfield:

dragonreine:

I have to say, this is probably one of the prettiest portraits I’ve ever drawn so far.
If only because of that insane mass of hair. 

Malvae is so fab! And yes, very pretty and has awesome cleavage. :P

clairebfield:

dragonreine:

I have to say, this is probably one of the prettiest portraits I’ve ever drawn so far.

If only because of that insane mass of hair. 

Malvae is so fab! And yes, very pretty and has awesome cleavage. :P

Source: dragonreine

let-it-golaf:

pixiedust-paycheck:

glorychildren:

NO PHOTOSET HAS MADE ME HAPPIER.

MY FAVORITE PHOTOSET IS BACK

I WILL NEVER NOT LOVE THIS PHOTSET

Source: iraffiruse

Source: c-isnenegro

racingbarakarts:

I’ve made a mistake

racingbarakarts:

I’ve made a mistake

doctorwho:

Series 2 - The Idiot’s Lantern

Source: rosestylerr

whedonesque:

Tracey: “When you can’t run, you crawl. And when you can’t crawl, you can’t do that…”

Zoe: “You find someone to carry you.”

Since dedicating myself to getting into “superhero shape,” several articles regarding my weight have been brought to my attention. Claims have been made that I’ve been on a strict workout routine regulated by co-stars, whipped into shape by trainers I’ve never met, eating sprouted grains I can’t pronounce and ultimately losing 14 pounds off my 5’3” frame. Losing 14 pounds out of necessity in order to live a healthier life is a huge victory. I’m a petite person to begin with, so the idea of my losing this amount of weight is utter lunacy. If I were to lose 14 pounds, I’d have to part with both arms. And a foot. I’m frustrated with the irresponsibility of tabloid media who sell the public ideas about what we should look like and how we should get there.

Scarlett Johansson for the Huffington Post [x]

More of her brilliant articles can be found here.

(via theshadowsinthesun)

Source: grimmy.com

How I Started a Con with No Experience

edwardspoonhands:

melissaanelli:

edwardspoonhands:

I didn’t.

I worked with a talented team of people who had experience running cons

People keep asking me how I did it in my Tumblr asks, and here’s the truth: I had a built-in audience of my own, friendships with a couple dozen successful YouTubers, and a relationship with Melissa Anelli and Stephanie Dornhelm who had created and successfully run LeakyCon from scratch. 

So if you want to know how someone could possibly start a con from scratch, ask those women, because they’re the only people I know who’ve done it and I want to be very clear that I did /not/ do it. They are the reason VidCon exists, and I had no idea what I was doing but they did and VidCon is forever in their debt (actually literally, since they are entitled to a permanent share of all VidCon proceeds.)

I’m not saying starting VidCon wasn’t hard, or that I didn’t literally bet my house on its success…I’m just saying I didn’t know how to do it so I paid people who did to help us (though they gave me a ridiculously inexpensive rate). They are the literal best and I feel shame when people assume I did it by myself.

HAIL MELISSA AND STEPHANIE AND THEIR WHOLE TEAM!

OK, so, I get to respond to this properly now:

Hank Green, you are the reason that VidCon exists. We are extremely flattered that you would put that on us, and maybe we helped identify a venue and negotiate for reasonable contract details and order pallets of balls for the ball pits and barter with A/V companies and manage volunteers and liaise with special guests and that sort of thing BUT the creative vision was yours. While it is true you can’t hire just anyone to see your vision into reality (they should and I would even go so far as to say must be people who believe in that vision), you can’t do anything without the vision. And that was all Hank.

I don’t mean to imply that we only did the minutia: I sincerely hope we helped broaden and define and refine and actualize that vision in its infant stages. The driving force for every member of our team, in every decision and order and conversation, was faith to that vision. Every first con has its share of mistakes, and we did as well; but when you have excitement about and commitment to the vision, that tends to rise out of the madness.

And if you want to know how it all went down, I now have a great excuse to tell this story! How We Started a VidCon With Just One Year of Experience:

About twoish months after LeakyCon 2009, two things of note happened on the same day:

I missed a Skype chat from John Green
I missed a phone call from Hank Green

It was fall of 2009: the brothers Green were busy folk then but nowhere near the empire-leading media giants they are now. Still, it was far enough along in their worldbuild that I knew these things had to be related, and neither was an accident, and they either had something really cool to tell me or ask me, so I fumbled to answer.

“So, you know LeakyCon?” Hank asked me as though it was something at which we had greeted each other in passing, as opposed to something at which we had danced together so hard we had collapsed on the floor in a heap. 

“Yes,” I said, cautiously.

“Can you do that for us?”

He had a tiny laugh in his voice when he said it and then quickly explained his concept, which is what became VidCon. We hadn’t done much with these guys yet - we were barely past the Accio Deathly Hallows craze - but were easily excited to work with them further, easily able to see what worthy partners they would be. When Hank asked, though, I had two warring thoughts: a) he is a genius and this was an idea that is begging to be made into reality and b) I am still tired from LeakyCon 2009. So here’s what I said.

“No. But I know who can.”

I meant by that not myself but a triumverate: Steph Dornhelm,  MJ Harper, and me as a group. (Since late 2010 MJ has since been focusing on personal matters and no longer participates, but we still care a lot about her as a friend and former associate.) And, of course, legion of stalwart Leaky graduates alongside us. 

We were purposefully taking a break in 2010 from LeakyCon to shore up for 2011, and so when I called Steph and MJ and relayed the proposal to them (which would erase this gap year) it was met with that same sort of “oh, why not, what’s having a life, anyway?” sort of reaction that means “this is going to make our lives completely nuts but holy heck do we want to be part of building this thing so let’s just make it happen.”

We had a ton of help. We grabbed some of our favorite LeakyCon staffers and pulled them by the hair right into the thick of things. Not that any of them needed much convincing; they were all on board in an instant. In fact, one of them (Laura Chernikoff) is now the head of VidCon’s special guests, wrangling some ONE THOUSAND GUESTS LOL EVERY TIME I HEAR THAT I LAUGH SO HARD, IT’S LIKE MADNESS ONLY FUNNIER.

It was only the second event we’d ever run. But we learned for sure what we already suspected after Leaky 2009: when you have people at the helm (like Hank and John) who are actually devoted to their attendees and who put their needs first, who are adults with good intentions backed up by common sense, credibility, maturity, and belief in the value of what they are doing, you have the best chance of pulling that first event off. And people will get on board with that real fast.

People can sense capability and positivity. You will quickly find yourself surrounded by other capable and generous people, be that volunteers with spectacular talents and abilities (who will easily make themselves known to you) or special guests who can’t wait to get involved and help in whatever way they can.

That means for most first events, the inevitable flubs are completely understandable and forgiven in light of the greater goodwill of the event. Audio mixups get forgotten; happy special guests spend hours and hours signing autographs or playing pranks on each other that go viral on YouTube. It means sponsors throw themselves into bag stuffing (a repeated phenomenon, we’ve found) and when you forget to order an amp for a band, the front man does the opposite of freak out: he drives to a store and lays out $300 for one without complaint. (That was Dave Days, btw. I sometimes have trouble remembering the names of famous YouTubers, but those who were incredible to us that year will stick with me forever.)

So with that said, and realizing that this post doesn’t come out of a vaccuum, I made a little how-to, and it’s linked here. How We Started a Conference with No Experience.

I hope it is useful and informative, though what I really think will happen if you read it is you will be forever sworn off ever trying to start a conference.

May the cons be ever in your favor!

Oh God…remember the time Dave Days had to buy an amp for us? Thannnks Daaaave.

Also, never forget that VidCon 2010 began with the Gregory Brothers singing into dead microphones.

Thanks to Melissa for putting this little history together!

Source: real-tweets